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All New Mexico Conservation Science downloads

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Bear River Climate Adaptation Workshop: Participant Notebook (May 2010)

Agenda, climate change scenarios, climate change adaptation framework description, background information about climate change in the Great Basin, and other materials that were distributed in a notebook to all participants at the Bear River Climate Adaptation Workshop of May 2010.

Bear River Climate Change Adaptation Workshop Final Report and Appendices (2010)

The Nature Conservancy (TNC) convened a two-day workshop entitled Climate Change Adaptation Workshop for Natural Resource Managers in the Bear River Basin on May 26-27, 2010, in Salt Lake City, Utah. The goal of the workshop was to identify management strategies that will help native plants, animals and ecosystems adapt to a changing climate and lay the groundwork for their implementation in the Bear River Basin. Thrity-nine representatives of 20 state and federal agencies, local governments, academic institutions, and non-governmental organizations participated.

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Lesser Prairie-Chicken Spatial Planning Tool (2010)

The model described here is a GIS-based spatial model designed to assess the impact of future development on lesser prairie-chicken (LEPC) conservation in eastern New Mexico emulates the Oklahoma Lesser Prairie-Chicken Spatial Planning Tool, a product of a collaboration including the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Playa Lakes Joint Venture, the Oklahoma Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, the University of Oklahoma, and Oklahoma State University. This tool is intended for use in planning for future development, minimizing negative impacts of future development on current LEPC habitat, and in planning conservation and restoration efforts for LEPC in eastern New Mexico. The model aims to provide industry and wildlife professionals a tool that can help: 1) site development projects with LEPC conservation in mind, 2) identify areas of critical habitat for LEPC conservation, and 3) identify areas for potential habitat restoration and/or species reintroduction, including offsets for the impact of future development activities. It is important to note that this study does not address any potential concerns other than the LEPC.

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Wildfire Risk (November 2009)

The Wildfire Risk data model identifies areas with a relatively high risk of destructive wildfire. The intent of this layer is to highlight areas where management is most likely to reduce the risk of wildfire damage, which is defined as reducing the impact of wildfire on natural resources, and human infrastructure and development. The model combines three modeled fire behavior parameters (rate of spread, flame length, crown fire potential) and one modeled ecological health measure (fire regime condition class) with wildland urban interface areas and ignition probability.

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Water Quality and Supply (November 2009)

The intent of the Water Quality and Supply data model is to prioritize watersheds important for supplying sustainable water along with the potential risks to water quality. For the foundation of the model, the technical team identified the following 10 available data layers: public drinking supply, priority watersheds identified by the New Mexico Nonpoint Source Management Program (WQCC 2009), impaired waters (see below for complete description), specific New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) impaired/impacted watersheds, percent irrigated cropland and pasture, NMED water quality risks, aquifer recharge areas, aquifer vulnerability, impervious surface, and erosion risk.

Download file (122 MB)

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